Remote working tech security tips for digital nomads

dojo-bali-digital-nomad-remote-work

I’ve been working remotely recently from Thailand and Bali and have  seen a worrying lack of security awareness in fellow nomads.  We’re responsible for not only our own data and passwords but also client related files and passwords so a security breach would be more significant than a tourist losing their phone. Here are a few simple tech security tips for any digital nomads working on the road.

VPN

Some websites are blocked in other countries and a VPN gets around this. I was using Tunnelbear (love their branding) but found that FTP connections to our server were not reliable via this VPN so I switched to Private Internet Access which has worked great. It runs on my laptop, tablet and iOS/Android phones.

Another benefit of a VPN is that it secures your traffic which is peace of mind when working from busy coworking spaces and cafes.

Password manager

With sites and services constantly getting attacked and compromised, it’s vital to have hard to crack, unique passwords. This makes remembering them hard though and that’s where a password manager comes in handy. I use 1Password as it works on all my Mac, tablet and phones.

I also use the team version so my tech support guy can access client passwords without me having to provide them manually. Different password vaults allow granular access to various types of password.

Cloud storage

The worst case scenario is losing the laptop and my data through theft or hardware failure. To get back up and running as fast as possible, I keep all my important data in cloud drive systems. I use (paid) Dropbox and (free) Google Drive.

I also keep filling my iCloud up with pictures of sunsets so can back files up to Dropbox or Google Drive to free up space and not have to pay for a larger iCloud account.

Drive encryption

To prepare for the worst, I encrypted my hard drive before leaving the UK. This way even if the laptop is stolen the data cannot be read without my login details.

Lock screen passcodes

I work from home most of the time in the UK so don’t have lock screen codes as they annoy me. I enabled these on all devices while travelling though to reduce the chances of someone accessing my personal and business stuff.

Summary

These were some quick and easy security tips to help keep your data safe while working remotely as a digital nomad.